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Thread: Brumation advice.

  1. #1
    Thamnophis cymru -MARWOLAETH-'s Avatar
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    Brumation advice.

    I plan to brumate gerry in the fridge.
    -A few questions I need answering
    I found two spots that would be suitable.1st stays at 11*C,2nd stays at 8.4*C .

    Which would be best to put her?

    How do I cool her down slowly without giving her a shock?

    How long should I brumate her for?

    How big should the container be? (she's 16cm)
    Ta in advance
    Will

  2. #2
    T. radix Ranch guidofatherof5's Avatar
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    Re: Brumation advice.

    11C = 51.8F
    8.4C = 47.12F



    I would think 11C/51F is probably better as T.marcianus doesn't range in the northern temps.
    Steve
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    "Preparing For Fourth shed" Spankenstyne's Avatar
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    Re: Brumation advice.

    I agree with Steve, the 11c one will be the best option. I have my Marcianus down right now in my brumation fridge set at 52-54f (similar temp as yours). To get them ready I make sure to not feed for 2-3 weeks so they can empty out their digestive system. Then they get a few days of being off the heat in my 70f-ish ambient basement and into an appropriate sized container (with air holes) that I have a couple of inches of shavings, and a water dish. I give mine 2 full months, but I also only brumate my adult breeders. I don't brumate any of the youngsters & smaller sub-adults.

    I haven't lost any yet but there's always a risk. I personally wouldn't bother doing it with one so small that's not going to be a breeder next season.
    Chris

  4. #4
    Thamnophis cymru -MARWOLAETH-'s Avatar
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    Re: Brumation advice.

    Quote Originally Posted by Spankenstyne View Post
    I agree with Steve, the 11c one will be the best option. I have my Marcianus down right now in my brumation fridge set at 52-54f (similar temp as yours). To get them ready I make sure to not feed for 2-3 weeks so they can empty out their digestive system. Then they get a few days of being off the heat in my 70f-ish ambient basement and into an appropriate sized container (with air holes) that I have a couple of inches of shavings, and a water dish. I give mine 2 full months, but I also only brumate my adult breeders. I don't brumate any of the youngsters & smaller sub-adults.

    I haven't lost any yet but there's always a risk. I personally wouldn't bother doing it with one so small that's not going to be a breeder next season.
    The reason I'm planning brumation is because she hasn't eaten properly for 6 weeks and is quite skinny.She is drinking lots so I think shes healthy otherwise.When I noticed the weight loss I switched off the heating in hopes she'd use less energy but she continued to loose weight because the temps weren't low enough.
    Will

  5. #5
    "Preparing For Fourth shed" snake man's Avatar
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    Re: Brumation advice.

    If she is skinny and loosing weight a brumation can be hard on her.
    0.1 Red axanthic x red radix

  6. #6
    Thamnophis cymru -MARWOLAETH-'s Avatar
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    Re: Brumation advice.

    EDIT:
    She's 40cm (not 16cm but 16")
    Will

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    Re: Brumation advice.

    My brumation temps are ranging in the 45 F (7.2 C) to 50 F (10 C) range. Perfect. They've been spending most of their time buried in the substrate but come out once in a while when temps are at the high end of the range. I have been keeping a section of the substrate damp and they do seem to prefer hiding in the damp part but after about a week it smells like a dirty moldy sock. Not sure if I like that. If it gets much worse I'll probably replace it.

  8. #8
    Adult snake Greg'sGarters's Avatar
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    Re: Brumation advice.

    I would stick with 11C. If she is skinny you may want want to reconsider brumating her. PM me and I can show you a picture of my brumation setup.
    -Greg
    1.1T.s. concinnus, 1.1 T.s. parietalis, 1.0 T.s. semifasciatus, 0.1 T. radix
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  9. #9
    "PM Boots For Custom Title" CrazyHedgehog's Avatar
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    Re: Brumation advice.

    I brought mine out of brumation this week, They have only had about 6 weeks, (although some of the adults stopped eating on their own about 2 weeks to a month well before I started the fasting) I was checking them every other day, I noticed one of the baby San Fransisco was very sluggish, wasn't happy about the way it looked, separated, yet she was dead by the next day . they had fresh water etc, but I think I may have had them a little too warm. these were very small and I had to assist feed - so although I knew they were small I thought it would help get them eating! anyway the others are awake, looking feisty and eating! a short break for them, but I need to sort a cooler place for next year!
    Inge
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    Re: Brumation advice.

    Quote Originally Posted by CrazyHedgehog View Post
    I noticed one of the baby San Fransisco was very sluggish, wasn't happy about the way it looked, separated, yet she was dead by the next day . they had fresh water etc, but I think I may have had them a little too warm.
    Don't sweat it! You're probably doing "better" than nature could. A little too cold... a little too warm ... too much food.. not enough... What the hell man!

    Many people only want "what's natural" for their garter snakes. Well... you got it! What's natural is that the majority of them die before they're old enough to reproduce.

    If there's any need to elaborate more..

    I mean... if you think such losses are "unnatural" just say the word and I'll show some statistics.

    If we really want what's natural for our captive garter snake than you should expect that around 95% of captive-born garters should be dead by age 18 months. SRYSLY.

    There's a very good reason why a female garter that survives 5 or 6 years has so many offspring in that time. Sure, she may give birth to 1,000 offspring in her life. So what? 996 if them might never reach breeding age. It's the other 4 that count.
    Last edited by ConcinusMan; 01-01-2013 at 06:43 AM.
    CrazyHedgehog likes this.

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